Sports Briefs

first_imgJGA’s HeroesWeekend ClassicThe Jamaica Golf Association’s (JGA) Heroes Weekend Classic will be held on October 17 and 18 at Sandals Golf and Country Club.Sandals Ocho Rios will be offering a special rate of US$300 per couple per night for golfers who are entered in the JGA event. The entry fee is $8,000 for members and $9,000 for non-members. One day fee is $5,000 while the fee for juniors is $4,000.The cost for shared cart and caddy is US$27.50 per day. For walkers, the caddy fee is US$20.Antigua’s Joseph among winnersEDMONTON, Canada (CMC):Teenaged Antiguan jockey Kwame Joseph was among the winners as Caribbean riders continued to dominate at Northlands Park at midweek.The 17-year-old Joseph, in his first stint on the international circuit, won the final race of the eight-race card with 15-1 outsider Kaitlans Song.He was joined on the winners’ list by four-time defending champion, Barbadian Rico Walcott, who captured race three with favourite Wild Romeo, and Jamaican Trevor Simpson, who won race one with 4-1 bet Im Hott Ur Nott.Veteran Barbadian rider Desmond Bryan took race five with 4-1 choice Montana Skies, while fellow national Damario Bynoe scored an upset in race six with rank 60-1 outsider Gold Kiss.With just over two weeks left in the Northlands Park season, Walcott is coasting towards his fifth consecutive title with 127 wins, with Scott Williams sitting second on 68.Jamaican Tony Maragh is third on 48 but just narrowly ahead of Shannon Beauregard on 46.Switzerland qualify for Euro 2016LONDON (AP):Switzerland will return for the European Championship for the first time since co-hosting the tournament eight years ago after thrashing San Marino 7-0 yesterday with seven different scorers.As the Swiss secured second place, Group E leaders England made it nine wins out of nine in qualifying, with Theo Walcott and Raheem Sterling scoring in a 2-0 win over Estonia.With one qualifier remaining, Switzerland have an unassailable five-point advantage over Slovenia, who were held 1-1 by Lithuania.England are the only team with a 100 per cent record in qualifying for next year’s finals and should be top-seeded in the draw.Spain on a cruiseLOGRONO, Spain (AP):Santi Cazorla and Paco Alcacer scored two goals each to help Spain beat Luxembourg 4-0 yesterday and secure a spot for the holders in next year’s European Championship.Cazorla scored in the 42nd and 85th minutes, while Alcacer netted in the 67th and 80th to give Spain 24 points in Group C, five more than Slovakia and Ukraine. Slovakia lost 1-0 at home to Belarus, while Ukraine defeated Macedonia 2-0.In the final round, Ukraine host Spain who will be looking for a third consecutive European title in France next year, and Slovakia play at Luxembourg.The top two teams from the nine groups qualify automatically. The best third-place team also advances, while the other eight meet in a playoff.last_img read more

Solving Teapot Effect

first_img Citation: Solving Teapot Effect (2009, November 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-11-teapot-effect.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Previous research on the teapot effect has found that at higher flow rates the layer of fluid closest to the surface of the teapot spout becomes detached from it and the fluid flows smoothly. At low flow rates there is flow separation in which the boundary layer reattaches to the surface instead of flowing over it, causing the flow to stop and start; in other words to dribble. A number of factors are known to affect how much the teapot dribbles, such as the diameter of the spout, the teapot material, and speed of flow, but until now no one has come up with a scientific solution.Fluid dynamics experts C. Duez, C. Ybert, C. Clanet, and L. Bocquet, from the University of Lyon have solved the problem by identifying the fundamental cause of dribbling: a “hydro-capillary” effect that keeps the liquid in contact with the surface as it leaves the spout. The other factors — “wettability” of the teapot material, velocity of the flow, and curvature of the lip — determine the strength of this effect.The authors suggest that one way to avoid dribbling is to make the lip of the spout as thin as possible (as in metal teapots, which rarely dribble), while the ultimate way to instantly stop dribbling and end the teapot effect for good is to use a thin, sharp-ended spout and coat the lip with one of the latest super-hydrophobic materials. These materials strongly repel water and prevent the tea from clinging to the teapot material, which adds weight to the old idea that smearing butter on the spout stops dribbling.Duez and his colleagues also suggest that some super-hydrophobic materials can be controlled electronically, and while it is hard to see why anyone would want a teapot with a dribble switch, there may be applications in controlling fluid flow in microfluidic devices.The research paper is published online in arXiv.org.More information: Beating the teapot effect, C. Duez, C. Ybert, C. Clanet, L. Bocquet, arXiv:0910.3306© 2009 PhysOrg.com Innovative spout will increase maple production up to 90 percent Explore further Beating the teapot effect with a superhydrophobic coating. Top: water flow under the spout of an (hydrophilic) teapot, exhibiting a bending of the streamlines (a), and drip-ping as the water flow decreases (a’). Bottom: In contrast, a teapot with a spout coated by a superhydrophobic coating (here black soot) fully avoids dripping (b and b’). Image: FIG 1. from arXiv:0910.3306. (PhysOrg.com) — A team of scientists from France have worked out why teapots dribble at low flow rates, and how to stop them. The effect is called the “teapot effect”, and solving it could finally put an end to tea stains from dribbling teapots.last_img read more